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Eliza Doolittle Day, May 19, 5p

Third Thursday Art Salon celebrates the literary arts as we celebrate Eliza Doolittle Day at the Museum of Art! Join the event on Thursday, May 19, 5 – 8pm, for “My Fair Lady”- themed crafts and exploration of Edwardian culture.

Art Salon, which takes place in the Las Cruces Museum of Art every third Thursday from 5pm to 8pm, is your monthly evening to learn about art. Guided walks through the gallery, discussions about local and regional art, and art-making opportunities provide new ways to engage with art in the museum and beyond.

The museum is located at 491 N. Main Street and open Tuesday through Friday from 10am to 4:30pm, Thursday from 10am to 8pm, and Saturday from 9am to 4:30pm.  For additional information, visit the website at: http://las-cruces.org/museums or call 575-541-2137.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

Downtown Ramble, Friday, May 6

Art Ramble

Celebrate Las Cruces with a stroll downtown! Visit galleries, shops, businesses and restaurants. Enjoy the wonderful spring air, art openings, exhibits, music, entertainment, open mic opportunities, shopping, refreshments and more.

Downtown Main Street.  5 – 7 pm.

Free, open admission for all ages.

Railroad Days and Street Art Festival, Saturday, May 7

9th Annual Railroad Days, May 6 and 7, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Please join us for our ninth annual Railroad Days, May 6 and 7, 2016, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm each day. All festivities celebrate Las Cruces’ railroading past and present. Throughout the two-day event, the Dona Ana Modular Railroad Club will have their H-O model train layouts running and expert modelers will be on hand to answer questions.

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The Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad will have a locomotive on display (no rides) on Saturday. Inside the museum, Harvey Girl and railroad worker re-enactors from the Railroad and Transportation Museum of El Paso will talk about working for the railroads, and various museums from the area will have information tables.  Musical entertainment will be provided by the Las Cruces Ukes and the Country Drifters.  In conjunction with the Branigan Cultural Center, guided mural walks will be led through the neighborhood, and information about hobo signs and symbols will be available. Quilter Lynn Moseley will be creating a hobo signs quilt throughout the day. Outdoors, demonstrations of steam engines will take place hourly, weather permitting.  Two railroad speeders will also be on display.

3rd Annual Street Art Festival, Saturday, May 7, 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

Join us on Saturday, May 7, 2016, 9:00am-2:00pm, for the third annual indigenous street art festival. “PictoGraff: the Art of Warprayer” highlights the historical value of wall art and expressions of the Indigenous mind.

 

Music, STEM, and Animals! Saturdays in May at MoNaS!

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Animal Encounters is held at 11:30 am NOT 1:30 pm!!!

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Animal Encounters is held at 11:30 am NOT 1:30 pm!!!

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Freedom Riders, May 12

Join us on Thursday, May 12, 2016, at 6:00pm at the Branigan Cultural Center, to screen the documentary “The Freedom Riders”, part of the Created Equal film series.

Attracting a diverse group of volunteers—black and white, young and old, male and female, secular and religious, northern and southern—the Freedom Rides of 1961 took the civil rights struggle out of the courtroom and onto the streets of the Jim Crow South. “The Freedom Riders” tells the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of a time when white and black volunteers riding a bus into the Deep South risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. The film includes previously unseen amateur 8-mm footage of the burning bus on which some Freedom Riders were temporarily trapped, taken by a local twelve-year-old and held as evidence since 1961 by the FBI.

This is the final of four screenings held in Spring 2016 as part of the Created Equal series. As the nation marks historic anniversaries of the Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington, Created Equal brings together four nationally-acclaimed documentary films on the long Civil Rights movement. Join us for the film and a discussion on racial equity, civil rights, and our own community.

The Created Equal film series is sponsored by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. Among the events and programs to be offered through summer 2016 are lectures, discussions, book clubs, and community research.

The Branigan Cultural Center is located at 501 N. Main Street and is open Tuesday through Friday from 10am to 4:30pm, Thursday from 10am to 8pm, and Saturday from 9am to 4:30pm.  For additional information, visit the website at: http://las-cruces.org/museums or call 575-541-2154.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

“Visions of Our Monument” an artist talk with Meg G. Freyermuth, May 14

Join us on Saturday, May 14, at 1:00pm at the Branigan Cultural Center for an artist talk with Meg G. Freyermuth entitled, “Visions of Our Monument.” Freyermuth will discuss the inspirations for her work and some of her artistic process, guiding visitors through her works on display in the gallery.

Meg G. Freyermuth is an artist from Las Cruces, New Mexico, who paints portraits of wilderness areas, particularly in the southwestern United States. Freyermuth has been a serious artist since 2003, and received her BFA in Painting from New Mexico State University in 2009. One of Freyermuth’s most recent accomplishments was being chosen as the first Artist-In-Residence for the Organ Mountains Desert Peaks National Monument, a residency she completed in September 2015. Freyermuth works to highlight the importance of environmental conservation, historical preservation, and access to art in the modern age.

This lecture is part of the Latino Americans: 500 years of history programming series. Latino Americans: 500 Years of History has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association.

History Notes, monthly lectures on historical topics, take place on the second Thursday of each month at 1pm. Lectures are free and open to the public. The 2016 History Notes lecture series features topics related to Hispanic American Histories and Cultures of the Southwest. Please check our webpage or Facebook for a full listing of these and other Branigan Cultural Center public programs.

The Branigan Cultural Center is located at 501 North Main Street and is open Tuesday through Friday from 10am to 4:30pm, Thursday from 10am to 8pm, and Saturday from 9am to 4:30pm.  For additional information, visit the website at: http://las-cruces.org/museums or call 575.541.2154.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

“Graphicano Scream/Brown Revolution: Xicana/o Art in the 20th and 21st centuries” by Erica Marin – May 12

Join us for our May History Notes lecture at 1:00pm on Thursday, May 12, by Erica Marin, entitled “Graphicano Scream/Brown Revolution: Xicana/o Art in the 20th and 21st centuries,” at the Branigan Cultural Center.

Born in El Paso, Texas, Erica Marin identifies as a Chicana. Both of her parents encouraged a strong sense of border identity and a social conscience. Her artwork is both a celebration and a critique of the complicated relationship between the two sister cities (Juarez and El Paso), its people, and its culture. She uses her art as a tool for social and political commentary, focusing on current issues that affect the border community as well as the struggles that affect our Mexican brothers and sisters. In addition, Erica Marin has a degree in museum conservation. She chose that path so that she could help her community preserve its cultural patrimony, as she believes it is a form of resistance. Becoming a Chicana with a deep political root in social justice, has been a continual process of discovery for Erica Marin, one where she has had to synthesize a variety of cultural influences while staying true to what matters the most, the people.

This lecture is part of the Latino Americans: 500 years of History programming series. Latino Americans: 500 Years of History has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association.

History Notes, monthly lectures on historical topics, take place on the second Thursday of each month at 1pm. Lectures are free and open to the public. The 2016 History Notes lecture series features topics related to Hispanic American Histories and Cultures of the Southwest. Please check our webpage or Facebook for a full listing of these and other Branigan Cultural Center public programs.

The Branigan Cultural Center is located at 501 North Main Street and is open Tuesday through Friday from 10am to 4:30pm, Thursday from 10am to 8pm, and Saturday from 9am to 4:30pm.  For additional information, visit the website at: http://las-cruces.org/museums or call 575.541.2154.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

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