Skip to content

Last Chance to View Museum of Art Exhibition, Guided Tour, March 25, 11 am

A closing-day guided tour of ReTooled: Highlights from the Hechinger Collection will be offered on Saturday, March 25, 2017, at 11am.

ReTooled1

Featuring over 40 works by 28 artists, ReTooled reimagines the often-overlooked subject of tools with wit, pun, and insight. Curated by Jared Packard-Winkler, ReTooled celebrates the prevalence of tools with art that transforms utilitarian objects into fanciful works that speak of humor and beauty. Over the course of 30 years, hardware chain owner John Hechinger amassed a collection of over 300 works of 20th century art. Hechinger’s quest to assemble a preeminent art collection unifying the theme of tools rested on the notion that everyday instruments could be objects of beauty and reverence. Artists represented in the exhibition include Red Grooms, Jacob Lawrence, Berenice Abbott, Jim Dine, and Las Cruces artist Stephen Hansen, among others.

Retooled

ReTooled was organized by International Arts & Artists, Washington, D.C., from Tools as Art: The Hechinger Collection, a gift of John and June Hechinger to International Arts & Artists.

Admission to the Museum of Art is free. The museum is located at 491 N Main Street and is open Tuesday through Friday from 10am to 4:30pm, and Saturday from 9am to 4:30pm. For additional information on the exhibition and related programming, visit the website at: museums.las-cruces.org or call 575.541.2137.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event, please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

2017 Archaeology Day, March 25, 10 am

Archaeology is the science that helps us learn about past cultures and their way of life based on the things they left behind. Branigan Cultural Center will be holding the 2017 Archaeology Day on Saturday, March 25, from 10am to 12pm.

Archeology

Practice tree-ring dating, make your own pinch pot, and learn about hieroglyph code breakers. Archaeology Day provides the museum visitor a chance to discover their inner Indiana Jones! Archaeologists from New Mexico State University, New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum, Blackwater Draw Museum, and the Bureau of Land Management will be available to provide information and answer questions.

Admission to the Branigan Cultural Center is free. The museum is located at 501 North Main Street and is open Tuesday – Friday from 10am to 4:30pm and Saturday, 9am to 4:30pm. For additional information, visit the website at: museums.las-cruces.org or call 575.541.2154.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event, please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

Art Scholar to Discuss Corporate Art Collecting, March 22, 3:30 pm

Michelle Lanteri, interim director of the University Art Gallery at New Mexico State University, will give a talk titled, “Collecting Visual Art in the United States, 1950-90,” at the Las Cruces Museum of Art at 3:30pm on Wednesday, March 22.

Michelle_portrait-e1486502418855

Lanteri is a contemporary art scholar and curator. She is also a regular contributor to First American Art Magazine and sits on several boards and committees, such as the Border Art Residency; Art in Public Places at the NMSU Hardman-Jacobs Undergraduate Learning Center; NMSU Artworks!; and NMSU Department of Art Visiting Artists and Scholars selection group.

Lanteri has co-authored and garnered grant support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the NMSU Southwest and Border Cultures Institute, and the Community Foundation of Southern New Mexico. In Las Cruces, she has worked on exhibitions for the University Art Gallery and the University Museum at NMSU, as well as an exhibition of local artists for the Camino Tattoo + Fine Art gallery. In Greensboro, North Carolina, Lanteri co-produced sixteen exhibitions for the GreenHill Center for NC Art.

Lanteri earned her Master of Arts in Art with an Art History emphasis, Native American Studies graduate minor, and Museum Studies graduate certificate at New Mexico State University. She also holds two undergraduate degrees from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Her areas of study were Art History + Museum Studies and Media Studies with a Spanish minor.

Admission to the City of Las Cruces Museums are free. The museums are located downtown and are open Tuesday through Friday from 10am to 4:30pm and Saturday from 9am to 4:30pm. For additional information, visit the website at: museums.las-cruces.org.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event, please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

Needle Punch Embroidery Workshop, March 29/April 5, 10 a – 12 p

The Las Cruces Railroad Museum is pleased to host a needle punch embroidery workshop March 29 and April 5 from 10:00am – noon.

rrm-needlepunch

This two-part class will introduce you to the technique and allow time for practice before you begin your mini masterpiece. The first session will be on Wednesday, March 29th, from 10:00 am – noon, when you will learn the punching technique and practice on a small swatch of fabric. The second session will be on Wednesday, April 5th, from 10:00 am – noon, when you will begin creating your mini masterpiece. Class size is limited to 6 participants, ages 15 and up. Cost: $10.00. All supplies will be provided, but if you like you may bring your own sewing scissors and a bottle of inexpensive clear nail polish.

During the Victorian Era, women created many beautiful items for their homes using a variety of needlecraft techniques. One of these was needle punch embroidery, a fun and easy-to-learn craft. Needle punch embroidery has been used to decorate clothing and decorations since the ancient Egyptians, and was used extensively by the Russians in the 17th century. It regained popularity during the Victorian era when home decorating trends leaned towards embellishing everything.

Come try your hand at this fascinating craft and take home a creation suitable for framing. Once you’ve learned the technique, you will be able to create many items for your home, from bookmarks, to throw pillows, to wall hangings.

Students must register in person at the Museum of Nature and Science located at 411 North Main Street. Registrations are due by Saturday, March 25th.

The Las Cruces Railroad Museum is located at 351 N. Mesilla Street and is open Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For additional information, visit the website museums.las-cruces.org or call (575) 647-4480.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event, please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

“Untold Stories and History of New Mexico’s National Parks,” by the NMSU Graduate Department of History, March 11, 10 am

New Mexico Graduate Department of History students Alyssa Brillante, Christina Montero, Heidi Iverson, and Joseph Seagrove will be giving presentations of New Mexico’s national parks and the history and stories behind them on March 11 at 10am-12pm at the Branigan Cultural Center.

Alyssa Brillante’s love of history and National Parks began in her childhood. Every summer her family would visit National Parks and learn about their history and the history of the surrounding area. Living in New Mexico most of her life allowed her the opportunity to explore the treasures of New Mexico. She is currently working on her Graduate Project with other graduate students, which will bring the National Parks of New Mexico to students, their families, and the public.

Christina Montero was born and raised in San Antonio, Texas. Her interests are Spanish colonialism in the New World, including the use of missions, Texas/Tejano history, National Park Service, public history, and genealogy. Currently, she is working on understanding the relation between the Hispanic population and genealogy, while also trying to increase the interest of doing genealogy.

Heidi Iverson’s interest in the national parks grew after the celebration of the National Park Services centennial this past August. Through research at New Mexico State, she has learned about the history of the National Park Service, and many unknown stories of the national parks in New Mexico. She is currently working on a publication focused on the national parks in New Mexico as her graduate final project. Through this publication, she plans to engage students, their families, and the public with what the national parks offer.

Joseph Seagrove spent eight years teaching high school social studies in El Paso, Texas after receiving his BA in history from NMSU. During his tenure, he independently created and implemented several new courses at his campus. A former Eagle Scout, Joseph is passionate about preserving the environment, particularly our national parks.  He has recently contributed research to an ongoing project examining the national park system in New Mexico.

Admission to the Branigan Cultural Center is free. The museum is located at 501 North Main Street and is open Tuesday – Friday from 10 am to 4:30 pm, Saturday from 9 am to 4:30 pm. For additional information, visit the website at museums.las-cruces.org or call 575.541.2154.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event, please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

“Ladies, Have You Heard?: The Strange History of the Equal Rights Amendment in New Mexico,” by Dr. Jamie Bronstein, Mar. 9, 1 pm

Dr. Jamie Bronstein will present a lecture entitled, “Ladies, Have You Heard?: The Strange History of the Equal Rights Amendment in New Mexico,” Thursday, March 9th at 1pm at the Branigan Cultural Center.

During her research on New Mexico history, Dr. Bronstein came upon a collection of telegrams in the governor’s papers from the archive up in Santa Fe. They were from women in 1972 and demanded a reform of New Mexico’s community property laws. Following up on her discovery, she found that there had been many requests for the reformation of the community property laws for many decades.

ERA.jpg

Her lecture will focus on the creation of New Mexico’s ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment of 1972 and its own state equal rights amendment. The talk will also focus on how the equal rights movement was nearly derailed by a backlash of conservative women in the state on New Mexico, and the anti-ERA movement being transplanted from Texas to New Mexico.

Dr. Bronstein has been teaching at NMSU since graduating from Stanford University in 1996.  She is the author of numerous articles and of five books: Land Reform and Working-Class Experience in Britain and the United States, 1800-1862 (Stanford, 1999); Caught in the Machinery: Workplace Accidents and Injured Workers in 19th-century Britain (Stanford, 2008); Transatlantic radical: John Francis Bray (Merlin, 2009); with Andrew Harris, Empire, State and Society: Modern Britain, 1830-present (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013); Two Nations, Indivisible: A History of American Inequality (Prager, 2016). This most recent book chronicles the persistent history of social inequality in the United States from the American Revolution to the present.

Admission to the Branigan Cultural Center is free. The museum is located at 501 North Main Street and is open Tuesday – Friday from 10am to 4:30pm, Saturday from 9am to 4:30pm. For additional information, visit the website at: museums.las-cruces.org or call 575.541.2154.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event, please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.

Reading Art Book Club will discuss Art Theft, March 8, 2:30 pm

The Las Cruces Museum of Art’s monthly Reading Art Book Club will host an open, group discussion on the book The Rescue Artist:  A True Story of Art, Thieves, and the Hunt for a Missing Masterpiece by Edward Dolnick on Wednesday, March 8, at 2:30pm in the Museum of Nature and Science classroom.

rescue-artist

The little-known world of art theft is compellingly portrayed in Dolnick’s account of the 1994 theft and recovery of Edvard Munch’s iconic painting The Scream. The theft was carried out with almost comical ease at Norway’s National Gallery in Oslo on the very morning that the Winter Olympics began in that city. Despite the low-tech nature of the crime, the local police were baffled, and Dolnick makes a convincing case that the fortunate resolution of the investigation was almost exclusively due to the expertise, ingenuity and daring of the “rescue artist” of the title: Charley Hill, a Scotland Yard undercover officer and former Fulbright scholar who has made recovering stolen art treasures his life’s work.

To jump start the discussion, the Museum of Art will show the documentary Art of the Heist-The Search for the Scream at 1:30pm.

Reading Art Book Club meetings are free and open to the public. Join us even if you haven’t read the book! For more information or for details on book selections, contact Stephanie Abdon at 541-2217 or e-mail sabdon@las-cruces.org.

Admission to the City of Las Cruces Museums are free. The museums are located downtown and are open Tuesday through Friday from 10am to 4:30pm and Saturday from 9am to 4:30pm. For additional information, visit the website at: museums.las-cruces.org.

If you need an accommodation for a disability to enable you to fully participate in this event, please contact the museum 48 hours prior to the event.